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Jack Rusell Benson got too close to oak processionary moths (OPM) and could have died - and now they are back terrorising the UK.

The capital of England and the UK is being plagued by an outbreak of toxic moth caterpillars that can cause itching, rashes, sore throats, eye problems and even anaphylaxis.

The heartbreaking story of a dog who nearly died after sniffing a toxic caterpillar is one that every dog owner needs to see it.

But within six hours, part of his ears, eyes and nose started to swell up and he was immediately taken to the vet. It turned out he had gotten too close to oak processionary moths (OPM) and could have died.


Benson's owner, who lives in North Camp, Surrey, said it took him around a month to fully recover.

He told Get Surrey: "He was medicated and it took two weeks to recover and then another couple of weeks of keeping it clean and removing dead skin."

OPM only live in London and some neighbouring counties, and were found in Guildford Mole Valley, Elmbridge, Epson and Ewell, Runnymede and Spelthorne last year.

The Forestry Commission say that OPM were first accidentally introduced to Britain in 2005, almost certainly when eggs which had been laid on live oak plants were imported from continental Europe.

People and animals can come into contact with the hairs when they are blown by the wind.

If you see the caterpillars or their nests, do not approach, touch or try to remove them.

Instead, call in pest control if they are on your own trees and call NHS111 or visit a doctor if you think you have had a serious allergic reaction.

You should also keep animals away from OPM and consult a vet if you think your pet or livestock has been seriously affected.

A dog brutal injuries after sniffing toxic caterpillar

Doglopedix


Jack Rusell Benson got too close to oak processionary moths (OPM) and could have died - and now they are back terrorising the UK.

The capital of England and the UK is being plagued by an outbreak of toxic moth caterpillars that can cause itching, rashes, sore throats, eye problems and even anaphylaxis.

The heartbreaking story of a dog who nearly died after sniffing a toxic caterpillar is one that every dog owner needs to see it.

But within six hours, part of his ears, eyes and nose started to swell up and he was immediately taken to the vet. It turned out he had gotten too close to oak processionary moths (OPM) and could have died.


Benson's owner, who lives in North Camp, Surrey, said it took him around a month to fully recover.

He told Get Surrey: "He was medicated and it took two weeks to recover and then another couple of weeks of keeping it clean and removing dead skin."

OPM only live in London and some neighbouring counties, and were found in Guildford Mole Valley, Elmbridge, Epson and Ewell, Runnymede and Spelthorne last year.

The Forestry Commission say that OPM were first accidentally introduced to Britain in 2005, almost certainly when eggs which had been laid on live oak plants were imported from continental Europe.

People and animals can come into contact with the hairs when they are blown by the wind.

If you see the caterpillars or their nests, do not approach, touch or try to remove them.

Instead, call in pest control if they are on your own trees and call NHS111 or visit a doctor if you think you have had a serious allergic reaction.

You should also keep animals away from OPM and consult a vet if you think your pet or livestock has been seriously affected.

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