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It can be an  horrible sight a Seeing blood in dog urine, to say the least. The first thought that comes to mind is what's wrong with my dog? Is my dog going to die? Well, if you take proper and fast action, things can look a little better. Conditions that cause blood in dog urine are as follows:

In older male dogs, a prostate gland can cause blood in dog urine due to an infection of the prostate or prostate cancer. An infection of the uterus in females especially if she recently whelped a litter of puppies. Also, Kidney disease or canine renal disease, and urinary tract infection coupled with a bladder infection and or bladder stones.

The possibility exists that your dog might have gotten into a fight with another dog and was slammed to the ground causing internal injuries and internal bleeding. This can be a very serious matter in that internal organs might have been damaged. Or, he might have been hit by a vehicle. Get your dog to the vet immediately.

Your dog could have gotten into the garbage and swallowed something sharp like a chicken bone that punctured his stomach. In this case, the blood in dog urine is darker due to the digestive juices in the dog's stomach. And blood might be seen in his stool that is pitch black due to internal injury. The reason it is black is that it came from the stomach and was digested.

Accidental poisoning might have occurred when your dog got into the rodent poison the exterminator put down for rodent control. These rodent poisons are designed to cause internal bleeding and death to mice and rats.

Obviously, blood in dog urine has to be taken seriously, so get your dog to the vet immediately for an examination to see what's causing the blood. Once this is determined and treated, you can take steps to keep your dog healthy all year round especially if what he had was a urinary tract infection or bladder infection. The other causes for the blood in dog urine are really accidents.

When treated for whatever he had and is now well, you may want to change his diet to a more natural organic based diet which dogs have eaten in the wild for hundreds of years and start giving him natural remedies to improve and protect his urinary tract system health so that it can heal from within.

Specially compounded alternative treatments support the entire urinary tract system so infections are kept at bay. It has been documented that once a dog has had an infection or urinary problem the odds of it happening again are much greater so prevention should be what you strive for.

Let me just touch on the fact that the use of antibiotics as a treatment for infection carries with it some dangerous side effects, so do your homework and consider natural treatment that is safe and effective as preached by homeopathic vets.

Antibiotics are oftentimes needed for infections especially if there is blood in dog urine, but for all-around health and internal support, nothing beats the nutritional value of high-quality food and supplements, in addition, to exercise to help prevent problems from the start.

Causes and Treatment OF Blood in Dog Urine

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It can be an  horrible sight a Seeing blood in dog urine, to say the least. The first thought that comes to mind is what's wrong with my dog? Is my dog going to die? Well, if you take proper and fast action, things can look a little better. Conditions that cause blood in dog urine are as follows:

In older male dogs, a prostate gland can cause blood in dog urine due to an infection of the prostate or prostate cancer. An infection of the uterus in females especially if she recently whelped a litter of puppies. Also, Kidney disease or canine renal disease, and urinary tract infection coupled with a bladder infection and or bladder stones.

The possibility exists that your dog might have gotten into a fight with another dog and was slammed to the ground causing internal injuries and internal bleeding. This can be a very serious matter in that internal organs might have been damaged. Or, he might have been hit by a vehicle. Get your dog to the vet immediately.

Your dog could have gotten into the garbage and swallowed something sharp like a chicken bone that punctured his stomach. In this case, the blood in dog urine is darker due to the digestive juices in the dog's stomach. And blood might be seen in his stool that is pitch black due to internal injury. The reason it is black is that it came from the stomach and was digested.

Accidental poisoning might have occurred when your dog got into the rodent poison the exterminator put down for rodent control. These rodent poisons are designed to cause internal bleeding and death to mice and rats.

Obviously, blood in dog urine has to be taken seriously, so get your dog to the vet immediately for an examination to see what's causing the blood. Once this is determined and treated, you can take steps to keep your dog healthy all year round especially if what he had was a urinary tract infection or bladder infection. The other causes for the blood in dog urine are really accidents.

When treated for whatever he had and is now well, you may want to change his diet to a more natural organic based diet which dogs have eaten in the wild for hundreds of years and start giving him natural remedies to improve and protect his urinary tract system health so that it can heal from within.

Specially compounded alternative treatments support the entire urinary tract system so infections are kept at bay. It has been documented that once a dog has had an infection or urinary problem the odds of it happening again are much greater so prevention should be what you strive for.

Let me just touch on the fact that the use of antibiotics as a treatment for infection carries with it some dangerous side effects, so do your homework and consider natural treatment that is safe and effective as preached by homeopathic vets.

Antibiotics are oftentimes needed for infections especially if there is blood in dog urine, but for all-around health and internal support, nothing beats the nutritional value of high-quality food and supplements, in addition, to exercise to help prevent problems from the start.

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