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Think about it. Are you prepared for a pet emergency? Most of us have a first aid kit, our veterinarian's phone number, and the phone number of the Poison Control Center in our area. But, what about an emergency like floods? Do you know if your dog or cat can go to a shelter with you? If not, would you be willing to stay with your pet?

Do you really think that rescue volunteers can/will be able to get to your home to rescue your dog or cat? Your pets are your responsibility and you need to have a plan. Do not assume that because you live in an area that has never experienced catastrophic weather conditions that it will never happen.

The first thing you should consider is a pet carrier or crate that will fit in your vehicle. Even if you end up in a motel, you can keep your dog in the crate, or carrier if it is a cat. You need something safe to keep the animal in when you are not able to be with it constantly. The following tips will be of help in such a situation like a flood disaster.

• If you plan to stay, identify the location of higher ground away from the flood area and the best way to move your animals to this refuge. You should move your animals to these refuge areas in the event of a flood alert.

• Consider safety risks for your dog and humans before making any decision to move them.

• Maintain feed reserves in accessible storage above the flood level. Remember wet conditions may make farm roads impassable.

• It is important to decide beforehand on a safe place to keep your pets during an emergency. In making this decision, the vital points to consider are whether the place is prone to flooding, severe winds is at risk of flying debris, and whether it can be accessed after an extreme event.

• If it is likely that you will need to evacuate your pets, you should determine when will be the most appropriate and safest time to do so. Also, determine how much time is required to move your animals safely.

• Practice your disaster plan at least once a year.

The below video is the reason this article. It is true that motherly instincts are more powerful than any natural disaster. And that might be the reason this dog swam through dangerous and dirty flood waters to save her crying puppy. This brave mum was able to grasp the pup in her mouth and carry him to safety. Even more amazing – witnesses say that the dog saved three more of her puppies from flood waters.

Safety Tips for Dogs and other Pets During Floods (Video)

DoglopedixThink about it. Are you prepared for a pet emergency? Most of us have a first aid kit, our veterinarian's phone number, and the phone number of the Poison Control Center in our area. But, what about an emergency like floods? Do you know if your dog or cat can go to a shelter with you? If not, would you be willing to stay with your pet?

Do you really think that rescue volunteers can/will be able to get to your home to rescue your dog or cat? Your pets are your responsibility and you need to have a plan. Do not assume that because you live in an area that has never experienced catastrophic weather conditions that it will never happen.

The first thing you should consider is a pet carrier or crate that will fit in your vehicle. Even if you end up in a motel, you can keep your dog in the crate, or carrier if it is a cat. You need something safe to keep the animal in when you are not able to be with it constantly. The following tips will be of help in such a situation like a flood disaster.

• If you plan to stay, identify the location of higher ground away from the flood area and the best way to move your animals to this refuge. You should move your animals to these refuge areas in the event of a flood alert.

• Consider safety risks for your dog and humans before making any decision to move them.

• Maintain feed reserves in accessible storage above the flood level. Remember wet conditions may make farm roads impassable.

• It is important to decide beforehand on a safe place to keep your pets during an emergency. In making this decision, the vital points to consider are whether the place is prone to flooding, severe winds is at risk of flying debris, and whether it can be accessed after an extreme event.

• If it is likely that you will need to evacuate your pets, you should determine when will be the most appropriate and safest time to do so. Also, determine how much time is required to move your animals safely.

• Practice your disaster plan at least once a year.

The below video is the reason this article. It is true that motherly instincts are more powerful than any natural disaster. And that might be the reason this dog swam through dangerous and dirty flood waters to save her crying puppy. This brave mum was able to grasp the pup in her mouth and carry him to safety. Even more amazing – witnesses say that the dog saved three more of her puppies from flood waters.

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